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Occupational Safety and Health Administration Regulations

February 16, 20232 min read

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is responsible for setting and enforcing workplace safety and health regulations in the United States. OSHA's regulations cover a wide range of hazards and issues, including but not limited to:

1.
Hazard communication: Employers must develop and implement a written hazard communication program that includes a list of hazardous chemicals present in the workplace, material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical, and labels on containers.

2.
Personal protective equipment (PPE): Employers must provide employees with PPE, such as gloves, eye protection, and respirators, and ensure that employees use it when required to protect against workplace hazards.

3.
Lockout/tagout: Employers must establish procedures for controlling hazardous energy sources during maintenance and servicing of machines and equipment to prevent unexpected start-up or release of stored energy.

4.
Respiratory protection: Employers must establish a respiratory protection program when respirators are necessary to protect employees from airborne hazards.

5.
Electrical safety: Employers must ensure that electrical equipment is safe for use, and that employees are trained on electrical hazards and how to protect themselves.

6.
Fall protection: Employers must provide fall protection systems, such as guardrails, safety nets, or personal fall arrest systems, when employees are working at heights above 6 feet.

7.
Bloodborne pathogens: Employers must establish a written exposure control plan and provide training and personal protective equipment to employees who may be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials.

OSHA regulations also require employers to maintain records of workplace injuries and illnesses, and to report certain serious injuries and illnesses to OSHA. Employers who violate OSHA regulations can face penalties, fines, and legal action.

These are just a few examples of the many workplace safety and health regulations enforced by OSHA. By following these regulations, employers can create a safer and healthier workplace for their employees, and reduce the risk of workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities.


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Erwin Caguiat

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