TITAN COMPLIANCE

Pre-Built Safety Manuals. Effortless Safety Compliance.

The Safe Bet Blog

Learn about Safety Regulations
and how to meet Occupational Health & Safety requirements

blog image

Occupational Safety and Health Administration Guidelines for Electrical Safety

February 08, 20232 min read

OSHA has established guidelines for electrical safety to ensure that workers are protected from electrical hazards while working with or around electrical equipment. Here are some key compliance requirements:

  1. Electrical equipment must be approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory such as UL (Underwriters Laboratories).

  1. Electrical equipment must be installed and maintained properly. All electrical equipment must be installed and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and OSHA standards. This includes proper grounding, wiring, and insulation.

  1. Workers must be trained to work safely with electrical equipment, including how to recognize electrical hazards, how to use electrical equipment safely, and how to respond to electrical emergencies.

  1. Electrical equipment must be de-energized before it is serviced or maintained, unless it is not feasible to do so.

  2. Employees must be trained in electrical safety. Employees who work with or around electrical equipment must be trained in safe work practices and the hazards associated with electricity. This includes lockout/tagout procedures and the use of personal protective equipment (PPE).

  1. Electrical equipment and wiring must be inspected regularly to ensure that they are in good condition and free from hazards.

  1. Electrical hazards must be identified and corrected. Employers must regularly inspect electrical equipment and work areas for hazards and take action to correct any hazards that are identified. Workers must be trained to recognize and avoid electrical hazards, such as overhead power lines and damaged wiring.

  1. Extension cords must be used properly. Extension cords should only be used temporarily and should not be used as a substitute for permanent wiring. They must be rated for the intended use and must not be overloaded.

  2. Electrical panels must be accessible and properly labeled. Electrical panels must be accessible and not blocked by materials or equipment. They must also be properly labeled to identify the circuits and their purpose.

By following these guidelines, employers can help ensure that their workers are protected from electrical hazards in the workplace, a safe working environment for their employees and avoid potential OSHA citations and fines.


Related Articles

Occupational Safety and Health Administration Benefits

How does the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Protect Workers?

Occupational Safety and Health Administration Regulations

Occupational Safety and Health Administration Purpose

Occupational Safety and Health Administration Guidelines

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Welding Guidelines

Workplace SafetyWCBWorkSafeBCLimits of ApproachElectrical SafetyPowerlinesElectrical HazardPowerline HazardSafety PolicySafety ProgramOHS ProgramOHS PolicyOccupational Health and SafetyOHS

Erwin Caguiat

Back to Blog

Fast Track your Safety Compliance Today

Copyright 2023 . All rights reserved

Powered by Loyalist - try it for free

Launched by Wolfmother Consulting - get optimized